Impacts of Domestic Violence

The impacts of Domestic Violence are extensive and very concerning. 

Some of these impacts include: 

  • Death, illness, injury and disability of the victim
  • Bruises on the body
  • Bruises on or around the eyes or neck
  • Sprained or broken wrists
  • Broken or fractured bones
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Shortness of breath
  • Muscle tension
  • Involuntary shaking
  • Changes in eating and sleeping patterns
  • Gut health issues
  • General health problems
  • Sexual dysfunction
  • Menstrual cycle or fertility issues in women
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), including flashbacks, nightmares, severe anxiety, and uncontrollable thoughts
  • Depression, including prolonged sadness
  • Anxiety
  • Low self-esteem and questioning sense of self
  • Suicidal thoughts or attempts
  • Alcohol and drug abuse
  • Feelings of shame
  • Feelings of anger
  • Hopelessness
  • Low self worth
  • Apprehensive and discouraged about the future
  • Inability to trust
  • Inability to form positive or healthy relationships
  • Questioning and doubting spiritual faith
  • Feeling unmotivated
  • Witnessing abuse and normalising this behaviour
  • Ongoing Anxiety and depression
  • Emotional distress
  • Eating and sleeping disturbances
  • Physical symptoms, such as headaches and stomach aches
  • Finding it hard to manage stress
  • Low self-esteem
  • Self-harm
  • Being aggressive towards friends and school mates
  • Feelings of guilt or blame towards themselves for the violence
  • Having trouble forming positive relationships
  • Developing phobias and insomnia
  • Struggle with going to school and doing school work
  • Use bullying behaviour or becoming a target of bulling
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Find it hard to solve problems
  • Have less empathy and caring for others
  • Homelessness
  • Isolation – from children, family and socially – further resulting in mental health issues
  • Repeated cycles of abuse – a victim may continue to enter abusive relationships or become a perpetrator themselves
  • The victim or witnessing family members living in a constant state of fear – causing psychological and physical harm (to general health)
  • On going violence, or the threat of violence
  • Frequent moving to avoid being located by an abuser
  • Regular Household conflict
  • Police involvement
  • Criminal court proceedings

Sources: Family and Community Services, 2019 – Joyful Heart Foundation, 2019